Sunday, October 04, 2015

The Homebody's Guide to Planning a Wedding (One You Will Enjoy!)

Although I may be obnoxious and the center of attention when it comes to my own family, it's a different story when it comes to other groups of people. My fiancé and I would much rather spend the weekend at home (with our cats) than venture out on the town. My group of friends is small but mighty, and large groups make me borderline queasy. (Don't even get me started on the awkwardness of small talk.) 

My fiancé is even more of a quiet, homebody type: he's not a fan of small talk and would rather sit, listen and take it all in when there's a lot going on around us.

homebody

noun, plural homebodies.
1. a person who prefers pleasures and activities that center around the home; stay-at-home.

When we started planning our wedding one thought dawned on us: obviously we'd be the center of attention at our wedding, but how would we handle it together? We've figured out there's always a good balance for everything.

Here's a few things I've learned along the way, or my Homebody's Guide to Planning a Wedding.

It may seem obvious: A small guest list.
If you come from a big family but still want an intimate day, this may be a struggle. However, cutting your guest list will most likely cut down on the awkward small talk with people you may not know that well. If you are able to cut your guest list without offending too many people, I'd suggest it.

Small bridal party
Having a small bridal party should ease your social anxieties from the get-go. I feel some relief knowing my morning of the wedding will be spent with my mother and my maid of honor, my sister. I think if I had a group of people buzzing about with excitement and emotions, I'd be a panicky mess on the edge of bubbling over. 

Scheduling time to breathe
I've read so many blog posts and websites with wedding tips over the last six months and one thing seems to ring true across all of them: you'll need time to yourself if you want to remain sane. This seems true for everyone, social butterflies included. Whether it's a drive with a detour following your ceremony, or a quick trip outside for two during the reception, the alone/breathing time with your soon-to-be spouse may be a huge relief on your big day. Although our wedding will top out around 30 guests, we still plan to have our own sweetheart table for just the two of us so we can check in on each other, have some alone time and ease any nerves before we start dancing.

If over-the-top isn't your style, DON'T GO THERE
I find comfort in having a small ceremony and reception. I find comfort in knowing I'll be wearing Converse low-tops that day. I also find comfort in knowing that a DJ won't be screeching out announcements throughout the night, as we planned our own playlist on our laptop. If you figure out what's really important to you for your day and stick to it, it will be easier to take it all in when it happens.

Talk it out.
Planning a wedding in six months (when I've literally only attended two myself) was incredibly daunting. However, I've found that blogging about the process has really eased some of my nerves. It has also taught me what's important, which is why we opted for an intimate day surrounded by our closest loved ones. If you start to feel anxious at any time leading up to the big day (or even the day of!) talk it out. Blog about it, talk to your mom, talk to your fiancé, do what you have to do. Everyone copes with things differently, and as a homebody/socially anxious person, I'm finding it's probably better to express my feelings now, rather than accidentally burst the day of.

Did you feel any social anxiety/nerves as your wedding day approached? How did you deal?

1 comment:

  1. Hi Jessi! Stopping in from the Sunday Blog Hop. These are great tips :) I was well am, a homebody too. I'm not much for being in the spotlight, so I can definitely relate. I think time to breathe, even during the actual wedding, was key for us. After our photos and while everyone headed to the reception, my husband and I took a moment to breathe together. Such a big help!

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